What Are Exotic Alloys and How Are They Used?

Steel Alloy Forged RingsIn this blog post, we’re going to look at three distinct types of exotic alloys and how they’re used in the world of alloy rolled ring forging.

HASTELLOY X

This is a nickel/chromium/iron/molybdenum alloy which is both resistant to oxidation and elevated temperatures. It is easy to fabricate and offers good ductility after extended exposures to temperatures up to 1600 degrees Fahrenheit (870 degrees Celsius) for 16,000 hours.

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A Comparison of Open Die and Seamless Rolled Ring Forging

In this blog post, we’re going to explore the differences between two types of forging: open die and seamless rolled ring.

Open die forging

Open die forging gets its name because the metal being used is not confined by impression dies. This process molds the starting stock into the desired shape, typically between flat-faced dies.

Open die forging allows for a vast range of shapes and sizes, from forgings that way just a few pounds to massive pieces that tip the scales at 150 tons.

When your design calls for optimum structural integrity in a large metal component, the size capability of open die forging makes it your best choice.

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Ring Forging & Milling Materials

seamless rolled ring forgingRolled ring forging is a process that works with several different materials, all with their own advantages.

For example, aluminum forgings are useful in applications requiring light weight metals. Titanium is known for its strength and resistance to heat and corrosion. You’ll find these same qualities when working with stainless steel, and see them magnified after forging.

Rolled ring forging is a process that starts with a circular metal preform that has been pierced to form a doughnut shape. The ring is heated and rotated to reduce its wall thickness and increase its diameter.

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What is Seamless Rolled Ring Forging?

Rolled Ring ForgingIn this blog post, we’ll look at seamless rolled ring forging: what it is, what it’s used for, and the industries in which you’ll find it.

Seamless forged rings are created through a process called ring rolling, which uses a machine called a rolling mill. The rolling mill can generate rings of a range of diameters and weights.

The process starts with a circular metal piece that is pierced to form a doughnut-shaped component. After this ring is formed, it’s heated to recrystallization temperature. From there it’s placed on an idler roll and moves towards a drive roll. This step causes the ring to rotate and increases their diameter and the wall thickness of the rolling rings.

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Advantages of Rolled Ring Forging

rolled ring forgingRolled ring forging is used in a number of sectors, from the nuclear industry to machine shops to pharmaceutical companies.

Rolled ring forging is a process that begins with a circular preform of metal that has already been pierced to make a hollow “doughnut” shape. This ring is heated, then rotate to reduce its wall thickness and increasing the diameters of the resulting ring.

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SRP Honored at SKF Supplier Day

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2011 SKF Best Supplier for the Americas AwardSKF Group: Bearings-Seals-LubricationSpecialty Ring Products was the proud recipient of the 2011 SKF Best Supplier for the Americas Award at the SKF Supplier Day in Shanghai, China on September 12, 2012.

SKF Group is a leading global supplier of bearings, seals, mechatronics, lubrication systems and services which include technical support, maintenance and reliability services, engineering consulting and training.

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SRP on “Manufacturing Marvels”

The Fox Business News program Manufacturing Marvels will feature Specialty Ring Products on Thursday, August 23, 2012 at 9:30 PM EDT. The segment will highlight SRP’s forging and machining capabilities and how our devotion to product quality and customer service have made us an invaluable partner to the aerospace, defense and bearing industries.

Manufacturing Marvels is a series that spotlights American manufacturers, their products, and the companies’ processes and customers. Nationally acclaimed John Criswell, a CBS and ABC news anchor for over 40 years, narrates the show.

The short program provides viewers an overview of SRP’s expertise, certifications and supplier approvals, and a front row seat to the forging process that manufactures the highest quality forged rolled rings in the industry.

The video can be viewed below:

 

SRP Attends AIA Conference

Specialty Ring Products (SRP) was represented by Joe Jennings, Vice President of Marketing and Sales, at the Aerospace Industries Association Supplier Management Council Summer Meeting in Hartford, CT August 14-16, 2012.

As a new member of the AIA, SRP had the opportunity to meet with leading Aerospace companies and suppliers including conference host, Pratt & Whitney.

Conference speakers and panels presented on the state of the industry, current and future trends affecting the aerospace supply chain, and potential changes to commercial aviation operations. This included a speech by Pratt & Whitney President David P. Hess on the negative impact of sequestration on commercial and military aerospace and the economy in general.

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SRP Certified AS9100 Revision C

In March of this year SRP received AS9100 Revision C Certification. The certification is a direct reflection of SRP’s ongoing commitment to providing the highest quality forged rings, precision-machined products and processes.

AS9100 System Certification: SGSAS9100 is a standardized quality management system (QMS) for the aerospace industry. Revision C is designed to meet stringent, complex and unique demands of the defense and commercial aerospace industry and provides organizations with a comprehensive QMS focused on areas directly impacting product safety and reliability.

To achieve this certification, the entire organization was trained on the requirements and processes of the standard and underwent a rigorous evaluation SRP’s production and quality assurance processes.

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